Anabolic Fasting



  • Hey guys! I am about to start anabolic fasting and I wanted to see if anyone has done it. I am planning on doing the following:

    12 days of less than 25g of carbs

    Then 5 days on with less than 25g of carbs and two days off where my diet consists of 60% of my carbs.
    Wah



  • I have read about the "Anabolic Diet" and by the looks of it It seems like it will cause more harm than good.

    1. Your serotonin will be low since you won't be taking in as many carbs. And because of that you will have a short temper.
    2. Consider the fact that right after an intense workout your body requires an insulin spike in order to distribute the macronutrients you are about to consume.
    3. You will be constantly tired.

    Correct me if I'm wrong I don't mind constructive criticism but I think that eating just a few less calories of "complex carbohydrates" a day and making sure you consume your daily intake in protein will not only make you leaner but it will also make you bigger. Just have to make sure you eat enough.

    Not saying that the diet won't work, just saying that there is a less painful way to achieve the same results.



  • I"ve been doing Anabolic Fasting for weeks now and honestly, I'm not a huge fan. I was on IFFYM and was setting constant PRs with Squat Every Day. As soon as Anabolic Fasting came out, I hopped on and have yet to set any PRs. First few weeks were miserable with energy level. I'm a huge fan of Cory Gregory. The guy is legit my idol in the fitness world, but this diet just isn't giving me the same results he is experiencing. Think I'm going to keep the Intermittent Fasting portion of it, but add some complex carbs on a daily basis (as kyriakos said).



  • Thanks guys! Great input!



  • Honestly it seems like Cory just threw together all the niche diets and schedules he could think of. It has a pretty name, he swears by it, so it draws people in. Intermittent fasting, keto, and I'm pretty sure there is carb back loading in there too. I'm waiting for the next variable he decides to add into the mix. as @Kyriakos said, it will work, sure. But why would you put yourself through more suffering than necessary to see the same results?

    However, the most confusing part is the fact that week after week, you are putting yourself in the ridiculous and miserable state of entering ketosis. This does not seem optimal at all.


  • REP

    to be honest, stick with IIFYM. its based on your body and wont harm you. just set your macros and follow them! Ive seen results with IIFYM and lifting heavy and thats what i swear by.



  • Just to clarify- If you're following Cory Gregory, the 25g Carbs in 12 days is NOT what he intended. If you check his website he made a follow up video explaining that the 25g of Carbs is part of the Anabolic Diet, which he pulls elements from. But he is not following that component. In fact if you follow him on snapchat, you will see that he eats a good amount of carbs everyday. Probably 30-40g. The difference is they are all vegetable based complex carbs. No breads, pastas, starch- you know the drill.

    I don't think he did a great job explaining it the first time, I had to watch the video he put up a few times to make sure I understood. the follow up video on his website really clears things up. But please haha.. eat more than 25g of carbs in 12 days if you are following Anabolic fasting from Cory. I hope that helps!


  • REP

    I am thinking about starting Anabolic Fasting for the summer. I have a subscription to Corygfitness.com so I have all of the information I need all in one place. I will definitely let you all know how I like it. However, I am kinda intimidated because I have never really followed a strict diet plan. I prefer to stick to the eat protein, eat carbs diet. If anyone has any advice I would love to hear it.



  • @Kyriakos is correct. Lowing seretonin levels won't help you in the long run. It will impair sleep and it will be harder to reach deeper sleep at night.
    Not only that the primary amount of your dietary needs are gone from carbohydrates. Carbs contain a ton of micronutrients. the only reason you should avoid "Carbs" Is if you are insulin sensative. most people are not. They just fear them like the plaque because they think if you diet it will help you lose water weight.

    Carbs are anabolic, they are used when you train and do high intensity cardio. Doing HIIT or training with higher volume on low carb is recipe for muscle loss.

    The part about the insulin spike is 100% false and has been debunked a long time ago, so no @Kyriakos that is incorrect.

    Carbs also don't make you tired, because protein and fat once in a surplus are used to convert to carbs and used as energy. While it may not be as effective as carbs. Carbs can help raise leptin, seretonin levels, t3 levels, and thyroid to help increase fatloss. You should keep them as high as possible regardless of goal to allow to flexibility when trying to add more weight or lose weight.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15277409
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17617942

    For most of us who train with an intra-workout BCAA or pre-workout meal there is stil food overlap as i touched in the other thread, do we need to spike insulin? absolutely not, food is still digesting, aminos are still present, so do we really need simple carbs post-workout not really..

    Could they be optimal .. sure why not? but remember the total calories/macros if meeting your protein/fat/fiber minimums on a daily basis are optimal for your goal.

    more:

    he postexercise "anabolic window" is a highly misused & abused concept. Preworkout nutrition all but cancels the urgency, unless you're an endurance athlete with multiple glycogen-depleting events in a single day. Getting down to brass tacks, a relatively recent study (Power et al. 2009) showed that a 45g dose of whey protein isolate takes appx 50 minutes to cause blood AA levels to peak. Resulting insulin levels, which peaked at 40 minutes after ingestion, remained at elevations known to max out the inhibition of muscle protein breakdown (15-30 mU/L) for 120 minutes after ingestion. This dose takes 3 hours for insulin & AA levels to return to baseline from the point of ingestion. The inclusion of carbs to this dose would cause AA & insulin levels to peak higher & stay elevated above baseline even longer.

    So much for the anabolic peephole & the urgency to down AAs during your weight training workout; they are already seeping into circulation (& will continue to do so after your training bout is done). Even in the event that a preworkout meal is skipped, the anabolic effect of the postworkout meal is increased as a supercompensatory response (Deldicque et al, 2010). Moving on, another recent study (Staples et al, 2010) found that a substantial dose of carbohydrate (50g maltodextrin) added to 25g whey protein was unable to further increase postexercise net muscle protein balance compared to the protein dose without carbs. Again, this is not to say that adding carbs at this point is counterproductive, but it certainly doesn't support the idea that you must get your lightning-fast postexercise carb orgy for optimal results.

    To add to this... Why has the majority of longer-term research failed to show any meaningful differences in nutrient timing relative to the resistance training bout? It's likely because the body is smarter than we give it credit for. Most people don't know that as a result of a single training bout, the receptivity of muscle to protein dosing can persist for at least 24

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21289204

    Here's what you're not seeming to grasp: the "windows" for taking advantage of nutrient timing are not little peepholes. They're more like bay windows of a mansion. You're ignoring just how long the anabolic effects are of a typical mixed meal. Depending on the size of a meal, it takes a good 1-2 hours for circulating substrate levels to peak, and it takes a good 3-6 hours (or more) for everythng to drop back down to baseline.

    You're also ignoring the fact that the anabolic effects of a meal are maxed out at much lower levels than typical meals drive insulin & amino acids up to. Furthermore, you're also ignoring the body's ability of anabolic (& fat-oxidative) supercompensation when forced to work in the absence of fuels. So, metaphorically speaking, our physiology basically has the universe mapped out and you're thinking it needs to be taught addition & subtraction.

    More:

    "ou do not need to neccessarily "spike" insulin for creatine to be maximally absorbed, but yes insulin is involved with the trasnsport.

    FYI: The insulin and creatine studies I have seen up to this point have involved taking the glucose 30 minutes after the creatine. This may be because the insulin release from the dextrose doesn't entirely coincident with the pharmacokinetics of the creatine absorption.

    Personally I think more consistent waves of insulin may be more anabolic than "spikes" anyway. This is because smoother waves of insulin more than likely affect ATP production more beneficially than "spikes" probably do. ATP is what rebuilds muscles and you want the most efficiency you can get here. I'm saying this because there is a delicate balance here between oxidative phosphorylation and lipogenesis (stimulated by acetyl COA carboxylase from HCO3-) in the mitochondrial in the presence of insulin. This "balance" I am talking about here is different for everyone though. Some people "shunt" over to lipgenesis so much sooner than other people. This has to do with other "global" processes happening in the body."

    http://weightology.net/weightologyweekly/?page_id=319

    The postexercise "anabolic window" is a highly misused & abused concept. Preworkout nutrition all but cancels the urgency, unless you're an endurance athlete with multiple glycogen-depleting events in a single day. Getting down to brass tacks, a relatively recent study (Power et al. 2009) showed that a 45g dose of whey protein isolate takes appx 50 minutes to cause blood AA levels to peak. Resulting insulin levels, which peaked at 40 minutes after ingestion, remained at elevations known to max out the inhibition of muscle protein breakdown (15-30 mU/L) for 120 minutes after ingestion. This dose takes 3 hours for insulin & AA levels to return to baseline from the point of ingestion. The inclusion of carbs to this dose would cause AA & insulinlevels to peak higher & stay elevated above baseline even longer.

    So much for the anabolic peephole & the urgency to down AAs during your weight training workout; they are already seeping into circulation (& will continue to do so after your training bout is done). Even in the event that a preworkout meal is skipped, the anabolic effect of the postworkout meal is increased as a supercompensatory response (Deldicque et al, 2010). Moving on, another recent study (Staples et al, 2010) found that a substantial dose of carbohydrate (50g maltodextrin) added to 25g whey protein was unable to further increase postexercise net muscle protein balance compared to the protein dose without carbs. Again, this is not to say that adding carbs at this point is counterproductive, but it certainly doesn't support the idea that you must get your lightning-fast postexercise carb orgy for optimal results.

    To add to this... Why has the majority of longer-term research failed to show any meaningful differences in nutrient timing relative to the resistance training bout? It's likely because the body is smarter than we give it credit for. Most people don't know that as a result of a single training bout, the receptivity of muscle to protein dosing can persist for at least 24 hours: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21289204


  • REP

    @prestongammons I've tried anabolic fasting before and personally I saw pretty good results. Doesn't sound like too many people have found the same results that I have. It helped me drop body fat while still continuing to set PR's. The PR's did not come as fast as what they did while off the diet, but none the less, I dropped weight while still setting PR's. The fasting part was tough at first but after the first week, you get used to not eating for 15 hours or so. Hope this helps and hopefully you find some of the same results I did!



  • I've been intermittent fasting for the past month or so and I've grown to enjoy it. My bodyfat has been dropping and strength going up as well. I'm not far enough into it to really recommend it to anyone though, just relaying my results thus far. Basically, I consume my last meal around 10 pm and then I am in a state of fasting until 12 pm the following day. At that point I eat my largest meal and then just abide by my macros for the rest of the day. I like it because I feel like I'm getting to eat more because it's condensed to a shorter amount of time. I generally train in the afternoons however if I train early I load up on bcaa's to help offset the lack of nutrients.



  • I started Anabolic Fasting about 3 weeks about, along with the Get Stacked 10.0 program by Cory G and theres no question, it's legit. Sure, there may be scientific evidence that would steer you towards another diet, but anyone claiming the carb intake is dangerously low simply does not know what they are talking about.

    1- To actually understand the diet, you have to subscribe/pay to be a member. The one video the highlights this diet is private, and any free advice you search the web to discover will mislead you.

    2- At the end of every day, you get to pound as much PB and as many bananas as you can eat. This is after two meals (and protein in between if you choose) that again...include as much as you can eat of the selected foods.

    At this point, I am down about 4-5 lbs than I was, yet people tell me I look bigger. My waist size is down, while working and maintaining my mass. No I am not breaking my PR's every day, but I have not gone down in strength either and bench max is actually up. I am in a transition phase, then I can move into Anabolic Fasting for Mass if I become "too shredded." This plan is really fool proof, and has been an awesome change for me, thus far. All of our bodies are different, which is why you should try as many different options as possible to see how it reacts. So with AF, I def wouldn't knock it til you try it...



  • I am a personal intern with Cory on his website and at Old School Gym and I am doing Anabolic Fasting.. For me the diet has been working very well, I have lost about 15 or more pounds of straight fat and put on muscle because I have became much leaner all while gaining strength and increasing my lifts.

    Now this can be done with any diet in the world, but being close and understanding it makes it easy for me to do and it has worked for me very well, all diets react to different bodies and it might not work for everyone, for me it works and that is why I am sticking with it.


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